IMG_0401.jpg
Solitudes and Seasons
Solitudes and Seasons

Ben Walker, Mandy Hudson and Robin Dixon

The British tradition of observing landscapes in the arts is so widespread as to be better described as an obsession. Like all obsessions, a sense of darkness is easily intuited and embedded into the very grain of representations, whether they be rural, liminal or urban. Instead of considering the popular and linear narrative of British arts as a continuous tradition of romantic pastoralism finding a pure, unquestioning sense of the land, a darker counter tradition is now perceivable; one that is still active in the production of work and necessary in its addressing the continuing issues that prevail within the landscapes of England in particular. This has been the basis for a certain horrific character in film and television especially but there's something more subtle and uncanny in this counter tradition. The writer, Robert Macfarlane, has labelled it the "English Eerie" and writes of its essential difference with horror as:

“...that form of fear that is felt first as unease, then as dread, and which is incited by glimpses and tremors rather than outright attack. Horror specialises in confrontation and aggression; the eerie in intimation and aggregation.” (2015).

The strain of this idea lies at the heart of all of the artists' work in question. Ben Walker's paintings play on the idea of the extraordinary lying in wait within the ordinary; the rural village or country lane seeming at first innocuous but gradually gaining a sense of something, in the words of the artist, "not quite right" housed within the initially picturesque vistas. Yet there's another type of landscape that is building within this field of work, a far more temporal landscape. The era of the 1970s in particular - with its violent public information films, casually horrific childrens’ programmes and ubiquitous edgeland settings in popular media - is evoked in much of the work to be presented.

Robin Dixon's work ties in with this sense of the 1970s as a whole being eerie. His paintings feature landscapes, whether rural, suburban or edgelands, which are sometimes interchangeable, featureless, or mundane, yet they contain an atmosphere of realised or implied unease or suspense, much like ‘Play for today’ and so on.

At a more interior level, Mandy Hudson's paintings present shadowy, depopulated spaces inhabited only by flowers. They hint towards an uncanny absence of people, perhaps the last houseplants growing over the remnant of a collapsed society; a surprisingly common theme in hauntology works and in the popular media of the 1970s and early 1980s. Hudson's interest is in "half glimpsed things and accidental arrangements" which highlights the serendipity of a post-societal collapse. They hint towards a Threads-like domesticity, an assumed continuation of life after we have been wiped away. It is the calmness that makes the images so eerie as, through that calmness, lies a quiet acceptance.

Estuary with Gulls.JPG
Ben Walker Library music 1.10.jpg
Untitled-8.jpg
Sebastian Thomas
Sebastian Thomas
Catherine Watson
Catherine Watson
William Mokrynski, “Galactic Coordinates” 2018
William Mokrynski, “Galactic Coordinates” 2018

20 x 24, Silver Gelatine Print on fibre based paper (fully archival)

Edition 1/4 = 1AP Framed in Perspex, Signed.

£ 1,440

Sale Queries: threecoltgallery@gmail.com

William Mokrynski is a London based visual artist who works with photography. His work has been exhibited and published internationally, and is included in a variety of collections. He studied photography alongside new media at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto in the 1990s, and later received an MFA in photography at the Edinburgh College of Art / University of Edinburgh. Sharing his lifetime of knowledge and passion about photography, Mokrynski has lectured and led workshops in 8 countries. While Mokrynski’s approach is often a hybrid of new and traditional photographic methods, his work is firmly rooted in the pre-digital realm, which he views as one of the plastic arts.

As the world transitions further into the pixel age, a churn of discarded photographic negatives culled from vernacular and professional archives are in circulation. Mokrynski is interested in this seemingly obsolete photographic artefact. Often detached from context and meaning, the photographic image preserved in the negative is reduced to an anonymous visual sign. For Mokrynski, these lost shadows of the past are stanzas for the future.

A monograph for (l, b)≃(209°, -57°) Galactic Coordinates, in collaboration with Lucie Award winning EYEMAZING publisher and curator Susan Zadeh, is in the works, along with a short experimental film with filmmaker Dennis Mohr, producer of photographic documentaries, Mugshot, Disfarmer: A Portrait of America, and Remembering Arthur.



Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Dinner" 2017
Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Dinner" 2017

20 x 24 Handmade Colour Photographic 120mm Print, Signed, 1/50

£900. 00 (Framed) / 600.00 (Unframed)

SOLD

Denelle + Tom Ellis -

Tom (b.1989) moved to London in 2013 to work at Curtain Road Studios along side the cities established and emerging photography community.

Denelle (b.1989) came to London in 2013 after graduating from OCADU’s fine art photography program to continue working on her self-portraiture practice.

The two met on a train home from work one night and were married after six months. Together they converted their live/work warehouse into Peanut Factory Studio, a daylight photography studio, and have shown their collaborative work in galleries and publications worldwide.

Denelle + Tom’s most recent personal series titled “Just Married” is their satirical view on a traditional marriage. Inspired by their honeymoon and shooting exclusively in traditional analog processes, the duo created snapshots of themselves in this fantasy world within their studio. Their work aims to highlight tensions between the sexes both past and present and the spectacle of marriage.



Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Breakfast" 2018
Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Breakfast" 2018

20 x 24 Handmade Colour Photographic 120mm Print, Signed, 1/50

£900. 00 (Framed) / 600.00 (Unframed)

Denelle + Tom Ellis - 

Tom (b.1989) moved to London in 2013 to work at Curtain Road Studios along side the cities established and emerging photography community. 

Denelle (b.1989) came to London in 2013 after graduating from OCADU’s fine art photography program to continue working on her self-portraiture practice. 

The two met on a train home from work one night and were married after six months. Together they converted their live/work warehouse into Peanut Factory Studio, a daylight photography studio, and have shown their collaborative work in galleries and publications worldwide. 

Denelle + Tom’s most recent personal series titled “Just Married” is their satirical view on a traditional marriage. Inspired by their honeymoon and shooting exclusively in traditional analog processes, the duo created snapshots of themselves in this fantasy world within their studio. Their work aims to highlight tensions between the sexes both past and present and the spectacle of marriage.  



Colours of The Land & Allan Manham
Colours of The Land & Allan Manham

Lise Herud Braten (Colours of The Land) and Allan Manham collaborated with photographer Jens Storch to create and incredible Ceramics Instillation. The influence of Norway was felt in Jens’ photographs of Ice Formations and Lise’s Ceramics which are hand carved from Porcelain and Stoneware and take inspiration from the naturally occurring texture’s in Norway’s rich scenery.

Allan Manham provided contrast with some stunningly coloured and elegantly speckled pieces which drew on African design in their minimalism.

IMG_8051.jpg
Jens Storch
Jens Storch
Isabel Wilkinson
Isabel Wilkinson

Camberwell graduate Isabel showed her large scale carborundum mono prints as a part of Three Colt Gallery .1 with an extended run into Three Colt Gallery .2. Isabel’s work is inspired by mythology and walking. Her psycho-georgaphicinfluence can be felt in works such as 3Am and Persephone where abstract eyes float, suspended in intricately textured space and rivers shimmer in the middle of the night.

Isabel Wilkinson
Isabel Wilkinson

An award-winning printmaker, Isabel Wilkinson makes contemporary landscape images. Using painting and traditional printmaking techniques, she layers textures and colours on canvas and paper, combining mythical places with abstract shapes to create new, supernatural landscapes.

Above:

“3AM” Monoprint with carborundum.

- £500.00 SOLD

wash+e-preview_6web.jpg
IMG_0401.jpg
Solitudes and Seasons
Estuary with Gulls.JPG
Ben Walker Library music 1.10.jpg
Untitled-8.jpg
Sebastian Thomas
Catherine Watson
William Mokrynski, “Galactic Coordinates” 2018
Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Dinner" 2017
Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Breakfast" 2018
Colours of The Land & Allan Manham
IMG_8051.jpg
Jens Storch
Isabel Wilkinson
Isabel Wilkinson
wash+e-preview_6web.jpg
Solitudes and Seasons

Ben Walker, Mandy Hudson and Robin Dixon

The British tradition of observing landscapes in the arts is so widespread as to be better described as an obsession. Like all obsessions, a sense of darkness is easily intuited and embedded into the very grain of representations, whether they be rural, liminal or urban. Instead of considering the popular and linear narrative of British arts as a continuous tradition of romantic pastoralism finding a pure, unquestioning sense of the land, a darker counter tradition is now perceivable; one that is still active in the production of work and necessary in its addressing the continuing issues that prevail within the landscapes of England in particular. This has been the basis for a certain horrific character in film and television especially but there's something more subtle and uncanny in this counter tradition. The writer, Robert Macfarlane, has labelled it the "English Eerie" and writes of its essential difference with horror as:

“...that form of fear that is felt first as unease, then as dread, and which is incited by glimpses and tremors rather than outright attack. Horror specialises in confrontation and aggression; the eerie in intimation and aggregation.” (2015).

The strain of this idea lies at the heart of all of the artists' work in question. Ben Walker's paintings play on the idea of the extraordinary lying in wait within the ordinary; the rural village or country lane seeming at first innocuous but gradually gaining a sense of something, in the words of the artist, "not quite right" housed within the initially picturesque vistas. Yet there's another type of landscape that is building within this field of work, a far more temporal landscape. The era of the 1970s in particular - with its violent public information films, casually horrific childrens’ programmes and ubiquitous edgeland settings in popular media - is evoked in much of the work to be presented.

Robin Dixon's work ties in with this sense of the 1970s as a whole being eerie. His paintings feature landscapes, whether rural, suburban or edgelands, which are sometimes interchangeable, featureless, or mundane, yet they contain an atmosphere of realised or implied unease or suspense, much like ‘Play for today’ and so on.

At a more interior level, Mandy Hudson's paintings present shadowy, depopulated spaces inhabited only by flowers. They hint towards an uncanny absence of people, perhaps the last houseplants growing over the remnant of a collapsed society; a surprisingly common theme in hauntology works and in the popular media of the 1970s and early 1980s. Hudson's interest is in "half glimpsed things and accidental arrangements" which highlights the serendipity of a post-societal collapse. They hint towards a Threads-like domesticity, an assumed continuation of life after we have been wiped away. It is the calmness that makes the images so eerie as, through that calmness, lies a quiet acceptance.

Sebastian Thomas
Catherine Watson
William Mokrynski, “Galactic Coordinates” 2018

20 x 24, Silver Gelatine Print on fibre based paper (fully archival)

Edition 1/4 = 1AP Framed in Perspex, Signed.

£ 1,440

Sale Queries: threecoltgallery@gmail.com

William Mokrynski is a London based visual artist who works with photography. His work has been exhibited and published internationally, and is included in a variety of collections. He studied photography alongside new media at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto in the 1990s, and later received an MFA in photography at the Edinburgh College of Art / University of Edinburgh. Sharing his lifetime of knowledge and passion about photography, Mokrynski has lectured and led workshops in 8 countries. While Mokrynski’s approach is often a hybrid of new and traditional photographic methods, his work is firmly rooted in the pre-digital realm, which he views as one of the plastic arts.

As the world transitions further into the pixel age, a churn of discarded photographic negatives culled from vernacular and professional archives are in circulation. Mokrynski is interested in this seemingly obsolete photographic artefact. Often detached from context and meaning, the photographic image preserved in the negative is reduced to an anonymous visual sign. For Mokrynski, these lost shadows of the past are stanzas for the future.

A monograph for (l, b)≃(209°, -57°) Galactic Coordinates, in collaboration with Lucie Award winning EYEMAZING publisher and curator Susan Zadeh, is in the works, along with a short experimental film with filmmaker Dennis Mohr, producer of photographic documentaries, Mugshot, Disfarmer: A Portrait of America, and Remembering Arthur.



Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Dinner" 2017

20 x 24 Handmade Colour Photographic 120mm Print, Signed, 1/50

£900. 00 (Framed) / 600.00 (Unframed)

SOLD

Denelle + Tom Ellis -

Tom (b.1989) moved to London in 2013 to work at Curtain Road Studios along side the cities established and emerging photography community.

Denelle (b.1989) came to London in 2013 after graduating from OCADU’s fine art photography program to continue working on her self-portraiture practice.

The two met on a train home from work one night and were married after six months. Together they converted their live/work warehouse into Peanut Factory Studio, a daylight photography studio, and have shown their collaborative work in galleries and publications worldwide.

Denelle + Tom’s most recent personal series titled “Just Married” is their satirical view on a traditional marriage. Inspired by their honeymoon and shooting exclusively in traditional analog processes, the duo created snapshots of themselves in this fantasy world within their studio. Their work aims to highlight tensions between the sexes both past and present and the spectacle of marriage.



Denelle + Tom Ellis, "Breakfast" 2018

20 x 24 Handmade Colour Photographic 120mm Print, Signed, 1/50

£900. 00 (Framed) / 600.00 (Unframed)

Denelle + Tom Ellis - 

Tom (b.1989) moved to London in 2013 to work at Curtain Road Studios along side the cities established and emerging photography community. 

Denelle (b.1989) came to London in 2013 after graduating from OCADU’s fine art photography program to continue working on her self-portraiture practice. 

The two met on a train home from work one night and were married after six months. Together they converted their live/work warehouse into Peanut Factory Studio, a daylight photography studio, and have shown their collaborative work in galleries and publications worldwide. 

Denelle + Tom’s most recent personal series titled “Just Married” is their satirical view on a traditional marriage. Inspired by their honeymoon and shooting exclusively in traditional analog processes, the duo created snapshots of themselves in this fantasy world within their studio. Their work aims to highlight tensions between the sexes both past and present and the spectacle of marriage.  



Colours of The Land & Allan Manham

Lise Herud Braten (Colours of The Land) and Allan Manham collaborated with photographer Jens Storch to create and incredible Ceramics Instillation. The influence of Norway was felt in Jens’ photographs of Ice Formations and Lise’s Ceramics which are hand carved from Porcelain and Stoneware and take inspiration from the naturally occurring texture’s in Norway’s rich scenery.

Allan Manham provided contrast with some stunningly coloured and elegantly speckled pieces which drew on African design in their minimalism.

Jens Storch
Isabel Wilkinson

Camberwell graduate Isabel showed her large scale carborundum mono prints as a part of Three Colt Gallery .1 with an extended run into Three Colt Gallery .2. Isabel’s work is inspired by mythology and walking. Her psycho-georgaphicinfluence can be felt in works such as 3Am and Persephone where abstract eyes float, suspended in intricately textured space and rivers shimmer in the middle of the night.

Isabel Wilkinson

An award-winning printmaker, Isabel Wilkinson makes contemporary landscape images. Using painting and traditional printmaking techniques, she layers textures and colours on canvas and paper, combining mythical places with abstract shapes to create new, supernatural landscapes.

Above:

“3AM” Monoprint with carborundum.

- £500.00 SOLD

show thumbnails